Historic Bath NC

Founded over 300 years ago, Bath NC is a small town with rich historical heritage. It is situated in the famous Beaufort County. Today, people from around the world see this town as an ideal place to settle.

In Bath Town NC, there are rivulets and water channels that meet with the waterfront of the Pamlico River. These beautiful water bodies are part of the factors that make Beaufort County an ideal place for sports and tourism. However, sports and tourism hasn’t always thrived here. Decades ago, there were fierce protests, violence, and racial clashes in the region. 

In addition to its charming scenery, the historic Bath NC is an epic religious centre – it is home to the St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Pamlico Church, among others. You can also find special historic parlors and royal houses here.

History Of Bath

The historic Bath NC is one of the oldest towns in North Carolina, United States. Many of the people who live here are of European descent. The earliest residents are the ones that settled close to the river, in the 1700s. John Lawson, Christopher Gale, and many other prominent French Protestants lived here.

Although this town currently seems all blissful, it has been plagued by political rivalries, brawls, and pirate attacks. In the 1700s, there was a famous pirate by the name Edmund Teach. He was more popularly known as Blackbeard.

Blackbeard decided to settle down in the Bath NC neighborhood. Not too long after, chaos broke out. It didn’t take long for law and order to be broken.

Blackbeard started a civil war that led to dark days in Bath NC. He himself ended up killed in a Military-Naval clash in Ocracoke, after years of war.

Historical And Cultural Landmarks

The history of a place defines its people in more ways than one. It is the basis on which culture is formed. That said, Bath NC attributes its cultural heritage to enthusiasts and explorers of nature. 

John Lawson, one of the enthusiasts of nature in Bath NC, documented the features of the town in his time. This documentary ranged from the geography of the land, the waterfronts, and then the routes that connect to neighboring towns.

This documentary gave Beaufort County a lot of bragging rights. As time went by, the county grew popular and gained statewide attention. With attention comes investments, and the town prospered on this. The Goose Creek State Park and Palmer-Marsh House contributed to this massive attraction. As a result, tourists visit in large numbers to explore every nook and cranny of Bath NC.

The town enjoyed increased trade, improved businesses, and exchange expansion. Sectors such as textile, construction, milling, tobacco recorded exponential growth and enormous profits.

Till today, Van Der Veer House is open to anyone interested in the exhibition of historical artifacts. This is the perfect place to learn the history and culture of Bath NC.

The Bonner House

The Bonner House is one historic site that sits here. Just like the town it resides in, this home is loaded with history. The Bonner House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). This listing serves as proof that this town is worth the visit.

This House is embossed with white paint and wood carvings. From outside, you can see a lot of glass used in the design. You will also see the walnuts, cedars, and shrubs. Art and valuable items are showcased like in a museum, archaeology centre, or tourist reserve.

St. Thomas Episcopal Church

This church is a popular landmark in Bath NC. It held its first mass service centuries ago. Everyone residing in this knows the church. So much so that paying a visit has become a tradition. The church building is one of the oldest structures in North Carolina. It often receives dignitaries and top government officials that come to pay their respects.

This church still offers a vast array of voluntary services to the public, such as land rentals and donations. It also built the central library auditorium in the county.

Over the years, the Church has been home to public figures, such as Rev. Bray Thomas. He played a significant role in spreading the Gospel, before the protests that happened.

The Pamlico River

The Pamlico River is a tourist attraction in Bath NC. The town directly entwines with the waterfront of this river. All the major houses such as the Bonner and Van der Veer are connected through the Pamlico River.

Despite its relatively minimal population, its heritage shines across the world.  This is one reason there are many creeks, watercourses, boats, canoes, and sail ships in the town. These also add up in making Bath NC a deserving center of attraction for guests.

In more detail, the waterfront view, like a magnet of beautiful weather, is always a blast for visitors. 

Pirates, Civil War, Clashes, And Violence

It has been stated earlier that this town has had its slice of dark times, but it still deserves a section of its own. The unrest was a bold reflection of religious, political, and ethnic rivalries. One rivalry that especially reflected this was the Tuscarora war. It was a battle between the settlers and the Tuscarora Indians. Another example is Blackbeard’s war. 

During the American civil war, the Pamlico river gave the military an edge over the pirates. This ultimately led to the victory of the military over pirates and other other violent groups.

The Present Day Historic Bath NC

Bath NC has developed over the years, thanks to technology and open-minded residents. Till today, it maintains its culture, and its history is documented in detail. The river still serves as a popular transport route. Ferries and canoes can be seen moving people within the town and out of the town. Also, they have a park now – The Goose Creek Street Park.

The Bonner House, Palmer-Marsh House, and other historic buildings in Bath NC are still standing. They are iconic structures that have been finely preserved and serve as huge sources of tourist attraction.

Looking for other Historic Areas across Eastern North Carolina?

Be sure to review our complete list of historical sites and other attractions across Eastern North Carolina in our main article here: The Historic Albemarle Trail.